Madison Kozak live! Sunday July 14th, 4PM

Post performance update!

Madison Kozak’s fundraiser performance at the Sturgeon Point Union Church raised over $3,000 for the Kawartha Lakes Women’s Resources.

Check out a video clip of Madison and great duet with her Dad and the rest of Sturgeon Point as backup singers.

Thanks again Madison. It was a great performance!

We are delighted to have our own superstar musician, Madison Kozak, perform a concert at the church on Sunday July 14th! Raised in Lindsay and at Sturgeon Point, Madison’s passion and talent led her to Nashville, where she writes and performs music “with a strong back beat and lots of groove.”

Madison has asked that the concert benefit Women’s Resources, an organization that works to help abused women and their children in the Kawartha Lakes region.

Tickets ($20 adults,, $10 kids) available at:

  1. SPA’s Canada Day barbecue at the park, Sunday June 30 at noon.
  2. SLSC – speak with head instructor Kate)
  3. At the church on Sunday July 7th
  4. By emailing [email protected]

Mae Macmillan remembered

March 13, 1921 — June 14, 2019

Celebration of Life: Tuesday, July 2nd, 2 p.m., at Eglinton St-George’s United Church, 33 Litton Blvd., Toronto

Mae has been a beloved member of our community and our church since the day she arrived at Sturgeon Point as a young nurse, to help Amy and Clair Stewart with their growing family.  

It had been her plan to stay for the summer, but she did not plan on meeting the dashing Flavelle Macmillan. That one summer turned into a lifetime of summers, mostly spent at their cottage in Sandy Point. 

Mae joined the board of the Sturgeon Point Union Church in 1971. She helmed every conceivable position until her retirement, forty years later.  For a dozen years she served as secretary of the church and the record of meetings, captured in her beautifully hand-written minutes, filled with her charm and wit, are a joy to read.

Mae was much loved and will be much missed.  

It was Mae’s wish that the church, and the outreach work it does, be supported in her memory. Donations may be received two ways:

  • By sending a cheque to:

Sturgeon Point Union Church
c/o Jeanne Crighton
43 Irene Avenue
Fenelon Falls, ON K0M 1N0

(We regret we are not able to accept electronic donations at this time.)

  • By donating with credit card or through PayPal via Sturgeon Point Association www.sturgeonpoint.com. Please write ‘Mae Macmillan memorial’ in subject line

The Christians, a play by Lucas Hnath

Performed by Toronto’s Scrap Paper Theatre, at the Sturgeon Point Church

Saturday, August 17th at 4PM

Free admission. All are welcome.

The Christians is a big little play about influence and faith in an American megachurch, and the trouble when its leader changes his mind. Pastor Paul is going to preach a sermon that will rock the foundations of his congregation. He thinks it will be well received. He’s wrong.

Peter Breyfogle remembered

Peter Breyfogle

Peter Nicholas Breyfogle

September 24, 1935 – October 20, 2018

Celebration of Life: Saturday, July 21, 2019

The Sturgeon Point Union Church played a large role in Peter Breyfogle’s cottage life. He was a faithful member of the congregation for decades, and served as chair of the church board, and trustee of the building he loved,  for more years then we can remember.  He will be sorely missed by his Point family, by Jo, Nick, Jillian, Charlie and Sam, and by his cottage friends. But he will also be missed by the church community. We look forward to being part of a Celebration of Life for Peter on Saturday, July 21, 2019

Death notice, Globe and Mail

Breyfogle, born September 24, 1935 Barcelona Spain, died October 20, 2018, Cobourg Canada.

Survived by his wife Jo, of 53 years; his son and daughter-in-law, Nick and Jillian; grandsons Charlie and Sam.

Graduate of Winchester College, University of Cambridge (Trinity College), and Harvard Business School. Champion rower, avid sailor, golfer, reader, and lover of bridge and crosswords.

World traveler and international businessman with Massey-Ferguson, Dome Petroleum, Investcan, and other entrepreneurial ventures, most recently in Egypt, China, and the Bahamas.

A celebration of his life will be held at his cherished home, Sturgeon Point, next summer.

Donations in his memory may be sent by cheque to:

Sturgeon Point Union Church
c/o Jeanne Crighton
43 Irene Avenue
Fenelon Falls, ON K0M 1N0

Our first bar mitzvah!

The first of many, we hope! In August, 2018, Kolya and his family held a coming of age ceremony at our church. The Sturgeon Point community was invited to help celebrate this important milestone in Kolya’s life.

For your interest… text I found helpful in understanding the rituals and tasks Kolya, his family and friends were performing at his bar mitzvah, an excerpt from “My Jewish Learning 101.”

“Coming of age for a Jew, which happens automatically at age 13 for a boy and 12 for a girl, is termed bar and bat mitzvah, that is, obligated to perform the Jewish mitzvot (commandments). A ceremony marking the first performance of mitzvot such as being called up to the Torah to say the blessings (known as “getting an aliyah“) began to make sense only in the Middle Ages. Earlier, the age of majority had little practical meaning because minors were “permitted” (though not “obligated”) to perform many rituals that were later reserved only for boys who had reached the age of bar mitzvah.

Bar/Bat Mitzvah History

The history of the bar mitzvah dates back to a fifth-century rabbinic text references a blessing (still part of a traditional bar mitzvah) recited by the father thanking God for freeing him from responsibility for the deeds of his child, who is now accountable for his own actions. A 14th-century text mentions a father reciting this blessing in a synagogue when his son has his first aliyah.

By the 17th century, boys celebrating this coming of age were also reading from the Torah, chanting the weekly prophetic portion, leading services, and delivering learned talks.

Religious reformers of 19th-century Europe, uncomfortable with the ritual focus of the bar mitzvah, developed the confirmation ceremony, which celebrated the acquisition of the principles of Jewish faith by older teens. The confirmation ceremony quickly included girls as well as boys and spread to Reform and later Conservative congregations in the United States.